ICYMI: WC agri department looking for student interns

The Western Cape department of agriculture is calling on students who need practical agricultural experience to graduate from their studies, to apply to its WIL programme. Photo: Supplied/Food For Mzansi

The Western Cape department of agriculture is calling on students who need practical agricultural experience in order to complete their studies, to apply to its work-integrated learning programme. Photo: Supplied/Food For Mzansi

The Western Cape department of agriculture is offering eight student interns the opportunity to complete their qualifications through work-integrated learning (WIL).

According to the department, the successful applicants will be placed with external host employers to complete the work-integrated learning required to obtain their qualifications. All applicants must be registered South African citizens and must be between the ages of 18 and 35.

The interns will be required to work towards a recognised diploma or degree within agriculture, at a registered agricultural college or university. “Successful applicants will be appointed on a fixed-term contract for a period of 12 to 18 months, depending on the requirements of their higher institution,” the department said.

A new Z83 application form – which can be obtained from any government department – together with a certified copy of of their relevant qualifications will allow prospective interns to be considered. A certified copy of their South African ID, certified academic results and a WIL letter from their college or university must be submitted by no later than 15 October 2021.

To see the rest of the requirements and to find information on how to apply, click here.

TLU SA suggests wage permit for the unemployed

TLU SA suggested last week that government considers granting unemployed people a permission permit that exempts them from the National Minimum Wage Act’s requirements. When applying for a job, those with such a permit could negotiate their own pay.

TLU SA’s proposal to the national minimum wage commission (NMWC) last week includes this suggestion. The NMWC has asked for feedback on a possible change to the national minimum wage (Act No. 9 of 2018).

“Before the national minimum wage became law, we repeatedly pointed out that the South African economy cannot sustain such a wage,” said Henry Geldenhuys, the president of TLU SA.

Henry Geldenhuys, president of TLU SA. Photo: Supplied/Food For Mzansi

“Last year, before the government adjusted the minimum wage for farmworkers by 16,1%, we even declared a dispute with the minister of labour, Thulas Nxesi, but still the increase went through.”

TLU SA opines that the country’s economic expansion will solve most of the country’s other issues. As a result, the organisation believes government must reconsider its policies in order to encourage investment in South Africa.

“We are still of the opinion that the application of the Minimum Wage Act and any suggestions to increase it in 2022 will have a negative and extensive impact on employment, farmers, agriculture and the provision of food in South Africa. Therefore we oppose any such suggestions,” said Geldenhuys.

ALSO READ: This week’s agriculture events: 4 – 10 October

Sign up for Mzansi Today: Your daily take on the news and happenings from the agriculture value chain.

Exit mobile version